HomeTop StoriesKari Lake's 'strap on a Glock' comment illustrates the Republican Party's penchant...

Kari Lake’s ‘strap on a Glock’ comment illustrates the Republican Party’s penchant for violent rhetoric

Kari Lake appeared to tell a crowd on Sunday to arm themselves in preparation for the election — just in case.

At a rally in Lake Havasu, the Arizona Republican repeatedly warned of a vague persecution she and her supporters will face in the months leading up to the November election. She said she felt veterans and law enforcement in the crowd “were ready for it,” NBC News reported.

Lake, who lost the 2022 race for governor of Arizona and is now running for a seat in the U.S. Senate, said “the swamp” is fighting against her and the Republican Party’s presumptive presidential nominee. Donald Trumpand she suggested that her supporters prepare.

“That’s why they come after us with legal matters; They’re coming after us with everything. That’s why the next six months are going to be intense,” Lake said, adding, “We’re going to put on our helmet or your Kari Lake ball cap. We are going to put on the armor of God. And maybe strap a Glock next to us, just in case.”

See also  Longtime jeweler Albert Lea will retire in June

Lake’s comments reflect the violent rhetoric that Republicans are seemingly comfortable with, thanks in large part to Trump, who enjoys using violent and inhumane expressions in his political speeches. Another frequent perpetrator is Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., whom my MSNBC colleague Ja’han Jones has referred to as “a mouthpiece for the conservative movement’s violent fantasies.”

Now Lake could very well have spoken hyperbolically; after all, that’s what she is not exactly known for attentive speaking in public. It is also notable that the rhetoric of the “armor of God” is common among the Christian Right, referencing a verse from Ephesians. (The phrase has notably been used by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and the head of the Arizona Republican Party.) As one expert on religious political extremism explained to Salon: “The full armor of God therefore makes one proud possible resistance to outsiders and assertive advocacy for their own positions.” Moreover, that belief in an impending battle between good and evil “justifies in their minds all kinds of extreme behavior and policies.”

See also  Erin Patterson, the alleged poison mushroom killer of 3, will appear in Australian court again

Yet such rhetoric – whether hyperbole or coded metaphor – is reckless at best, given the apparent growing support for political violence among conservative voters.

This article was originally published on MSNBC.com

- Advertisement -
RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular

Recent Comments